Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Habitual Offenders: Penalties in Nevada

In Nevada, a person who has been convicted of at least two other felony offenses can be sentenced to additional time in prison if they are found guilty of another felony crime. Under NRS 207.010, designation as a habitual criminal will result in harsher sentencing for any further charges.

If a defendant has been convicted of other felonies, either in Nevada or anywhere else, they face additional prison time based upon the number of previous felony convictions on their record.  
  • If convicted of two felonies previously, the defendant will be punished for a category B felony by incarceration in state prison for 5 to 20 years.
  • If convicted of three felonies previously, the defendant will be punished for a category A felony by incarceration in state prison for: 
    • Life without the possibility of parole;
    • Life with the possibility for parole after 10 years served; or
    • 25 years with possibility for parole after 10 years served.

Importance of Enlisting Strong Defense

The district attorney can choose whether to file habitual offender charges against the defendant, but the judge can also choose to throw these charges out. Additionally, the defendant can challenge the habitual offender charge, even if they are convicted of the latest felony. The court must then hold a hearing on the matter to determine whether the defendant should receive habitual offender designation.  

Habitual offender charges can result in excessive prison time, which is why it is crucial for a defendant to retain the representation of an experienced and effective defense attorney. De Castroverde Law Group prides itself on providing clients in Las Vegas with smart and aggressive defense against all types of misdemeanor and felony charges. If you or a loved one is facing habitual offender charges in Clark County, call (702) 222-9999 to learn how this skilled family-run firm can fight for you!